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Article Dans Une Revue Methods in Molecular Biology Année : 2021

In Vitro Production of Perdeuterated Proteins in H2O for Biomolecular NMR Studies

Résumé

The cell-free synthesis is an efficient strategy to produce in large scale protein samples for structural investigations. In vitro synthesis allows for significant reduction of production time, simplification of purification steps and enables production of both soluble and membrane proteins. The cell-free reaction is an open system and can be performed in presence of many additives such as cofactors, inhibitors, redox systems, chaperones, detergents, lipids, nanodisks, and surfactants to allow for the expression of toxic membrane proteins or intrinsically disordered proteins. In this chapter we present protocols to prepare E. coli S30 cellular extracts, T7 RNA polymerase, and their use for in vitro protein expression. Optimizations of the protocol are presented for preparation of protein samples enriched in deuterium, a prerequisite for the study of high-molecular-weight proteins by NMR spectroscopy. An efficient production of perdeuterated proteins is achieved together with a full protonation of all the amide NMR probes, without suffering from residual protonation on aliphatic carbons. Application to the production of the 468 kDa TET2 protein assembly for NMR investigations is presented.
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Dates et versions

hal-03015847 , version 1 (29-09-2021)

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Lionel Imbert, Rachel Lenoir-Capello, Elodie Crublet, Alicia Vallet, Rida Awad, et al.. In Vitro Production of Perdeuterated Proteins in H2O for Biomolecular NMR Studies. Methods in Molecular Biology, 2021, 2199, pp.127-149. ⟨10.1007/978-1-0716-0892-0_8⟩. ⟨hal-03015847⟩
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